• Zakayo Lesingo,resident of Nessuit,a sub-station of Mau Forest shows some of the remaining indigenous trees which used to produce plenty of nectar for the wild bees
  • Ogiek community has taken up livestock in response to adapting to changing ecosystems
  • December 14, 2016, Ogiek Peoples Development Program (OPDP) and Ogiek Council of Elders visited the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) at their Nairobi offices to present the historical land injustices Ogiek community has experienced in Mau Forest Complex. They were also accompanied by Endorois, Samburu and Sengwer who are also going through similar struggle.
  • OPDP Executive Director Daniel Kobei presenting Ogieks historical land injustices to KNCHR
  • Ogiek Council of Elders chairperson Joseph Towett speaking a during with the KNCHR to present Ogiek historical land injustices
  • December 14, 2016, Ogiek Peoples Development Program (OPDP) and Ogiek Council of Elders visited the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) at their Nairobi offices to present the historical land injustices Ogiek community has experienced in Mau Forest Complex. They were also accompanied by Endorois, Samburu and Sengwer who are also going through similar struggle.
  • Meeting with KNCHR at their Nairobi offices December 14,2016
  • Some of the girls who have benefitted from OPDP's sanitary towels distribution programme
  • The traditional log beehives the Ogiek community used for keeping bee in the forest but the practice is gradually fading away due to deforestation and eviction from the Mau Forest
  • The modern beeehives that the Ogiek community has adopted in response to changing ecosystems
  • Sarah Osasi,an Ogiek woman narrating to KNCHR CEO Patricia Nyaundi distress afflicted to community through state evictions from Mau Forest Complex

 

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The Ogiek Peoples’ Development Program (OPDP) was founded in 1999, and registered as a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) in 2001 by the Kenyan government. It was formed by typical Ogiek elders, opinion leaders, farmers and professionals after long land historical injustices that deprived Ogiek community of its rights as Kenyan citizen.
 

ADAPTING TO CHANGING ECOSYSTEM-WHAT WORKS FOR OGIEK

Anticipating rains, preparing land for growing maize and potatoes and finding a market for the produce is what defines the present means of survival for Zakayo Lesingo, a member of Ogiek Community.

Lesingo born in Logoman Forest within the Mau Forest Complex in 1971 considers it an alien economic aspect in the community. The forest was his home and the land where his parents gathered food for the family.

He had grown in an environment where his clansmen went out to the forest to hunt for wild meat and collect fruits and berries from indigenous trees inside the forest.

Honey was in plenty too.Log hives were erected on trees and the bees produced honey throughout the year because rain was never a scarcity and nectar-producing trees were rarely off-season.

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 OGIEK PRESENT HISTORICAL LAND INJUSTICES TO KNCHR

December 14, 2016, Ogiek Peoples Development Program (OPDP) and Ogiek Council of Elders visited the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) at their Nairobi offices to present the historical land injustices Ogiek community has experienced in Mau Forest Complex.

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OGIEKS BIO-CULTURAL PROTOCOL PROMOTING SUSTAINABLE USE OF MAU NATURAL RESOURCES

Ogiek Peoples’ Development Program (OPDP) has established a Bio-cultural Community Protocol (BCP) for the Ogiek Community living in the Mau Forest Complex which provides a systematic framework for engagement of the community in natural resource management.

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